Detroit’s Famous Heidelberg Project Goes to the Beach

 
 Dotty Wotty House (Photo, HP Archives)

Dotty Wotty House (Photo, HP Archives)

Article by Carl Swanson for VULTURE

Tyree Guyton, famous for his whimsically apocalyptic Heidelberg Project in Detroit, has often been categorized more as an “outsider” than as an “artist,” but now he’s moving inside. Literally: There is an elegantly and pristinely curated show of his work at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD). But also inside the art world: He’s joined the Martos Gallery in New York, which will do a show with him next fall, and in the meantime, they’ve brought his work at the NADA fair in Miami.

2+2=8: Thirty Years of Heidelberg opens at MOCAD September 7th

 
Tyree Guyton MOCAD.jpg

2+2=8: Thirty Years of Heidelberg is a retrospective ode to Guyton’s multi-decade outdoor installation, Heidelberg Project. Initiated in 1986 at the site of Guyton’s childhood home, the project was conceptualized as medicine for Detroit’s east side community following the 1967 rebellion. Over the years the project has evolved to span two city blocks, as artistic refuge for locals and visitors from across the globe. Combining painting, sculptural assemblage, and object-based intervention, Heidelberg Project is a cornerstone to Guyton’s robust artistic practice. In Heidelberg Project, Guyton ruminates on urban landscape and familial legacy—creating public works that speak to the possibility of shifting paradigms in which imaginative future and present reality live side-by-side. Using art to blur the boundaries of architectural function and religious philosophy, Guyton’s work is a reflection on historical impasse and speculative future. Please join us as we celebrate over 30 years of Heidelberg.

Members Only Preview: 6-7 PM
Opening Reception on Friday, Septmber 7th, 7-11 PM
Live DJ set with Husain Salah + Craig Huckaby: 6-11 PM
Admission: Free for MOCAD members ( $5 suggested donation)

 

RELATED EVENTS: 

TALK: THE HISTORY OF HEIDELBERG AS REBELLION

Saturday, September 8th: 1 PM - 4 P.M. 
Admission: Free ($5 suggested donation)

Join us for an afternoon with Rachel Adams, whose scholarship is rooted deeply in understanding and researching the history of the 30-plus-year Heidelberg Project. The conversation will speak to the history of the project, its relationship with the city, and the impact that the project has by challenging notions of outsider art, fine art, and public works in the contemporary art landscape.

Artist Talk.jpg